Democratic Republic of Congo Latumba

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Democratic Republic of Congo Latumba

7.50

Washed / Blue Mountain / 1700-2000m / 250g

OUR TASTING NOTES

Filter Rich and juicy with deep berry notes, black forest fruits, sweet, syrupy molasses and good body.

Espresso Bold and bright with notes of blackcurrant, raspberry and redcurrant, a hint of lime and an underlying brown sugar sweetness.

Flat white Stewed red fruits with fresh cream.

You will be able to select your grind setting once you have added to your basket. Please note that we do not grind for espresso due to the significant variation between espresso machines.

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This coffee was grown by smallholder farmers and processed at the Latumba washing station, on the western shores of Lake Kivu near the town of Minova. Latumba was built in 2014 and is run by the AMKA Cooperative, led by local farmer Kabugoyi Andre.

The Democratic Republic of Congo has gone through difficult times in recent decades as a result of the genocide in neighbouring Rwanda and two civil wars. Much of the country’s coffee production is centred around Lake Kivu, an area that has seen significant violence, conflict and upheaval in recent years. Since 2009, a Belgian NGO called COMEQUI has worked with farmers in the Kivu region to re-establish a sustainable coffee industry. The country is now producing coffees that compete well with the best crops from nearby Rwanda and Kenya, with high quality lots offering notes of deep berry, baking spices and a juicy citrus acidity.

As part of their work, COMEQUI set up nine coffee plant nurseries, donated 400,000 free coffee plants to local farmers, helped build several washing stations (including Latumba) and provide support and education to farmers. Latumba is equipped with an eco-pulper used to depulp the coffee cherries, and the station now produces around 60,000kg of coffee beans a year.

Once the coffee cherries have been picked and delivered to the station, they are depulped and then undergo an initial wet fermentation for 12 to 18 hours before moving through water channels where the coffee is separated according to density. The coffee is then soaked for an additional 12 hour period before being dried on raised African beds for 12 to 16 days depending on weather and humidity. The processed coffee is then transported to the Coffeelac dry mill in Goma where it is rested and milled, after which it is transported to Mombasa in Kenya, one of the main export ports for coffee and other goods in East Central Africa, for shipment to Europe and elsewhere.